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Venous Thromboembolism Prevention in Primary Care: Evolving Knowledge to Reduce Risks
 

OVERVIEW

As both clinicians and developers of policies regarding the use of thromboprophylaxis, doctors of osteopathic medicine (DO) have a substantial impact on venous thromboembolism (VTE) prevention and treatment measures throughout their institutions and practices. Knowledge of perceived risks of thromboprophylaxis treatments may overshadow DOs’ knowledge of their benefits; additionally, the complexity of screening for, administering to, and educating patients with VTE may further discourage clinicians from utilizing these treatments. Improved awareness of the real risks and benefits, particularly of recently developed direct thrombin inhibitors and factor Xa inhibitors, could improve physician utilization. There is overwhelming evidence that thromboprophylaxis improves patient outcomes and reduces healthcare costs, but adherence to treatment guidelines remains consistently inadequate. Due to the current failure of hospitals to adequately meet guidelines for preventing and treating patients with VTE, there is a significant need for targeted continuing education to help clinicians identify which patients are at risk for VTE, identify appropriate thromboprophylaxis therapies for at-risk and affected patients, improve the management of patients being treated for VTE or undergoing VTE prophylaxis therapy, and improve practice policies for preventing and treating patients with VTE to bring them in line with national guidelines.

GOAL

This activity will help clinicians identify patients at risk for VTE, identify appropriate thromboprophylaxis therapies, improve the management of patients being treated for VTE or undergoing VTE prophylaxis therapy, and improve practice policies for preventing and treating patients with VTE using national guidelines.

TARGET AUDIENCE

Primary care clinician including doctors of osteopathic medicine, medical doctors, advanced practice nurses, and physicians’ assistants. No prerequisites required.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Upon completion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • DEMONSTRATE appropriate VTE risk assessment for patients in the primary care setting.
  • APPLY evidence-based therapies for VTE prophylaxis and treatment based on patient criteria and risk factors.
  • DISCUSS outpatient VTE prophylaxis after hospital discharge.

Learners may earn up to 1.5 hours of Category 1-B credit* for their participation. The New Jersey Association of Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons is accredited by the American Osteopathic Association to provide continuing medical education credits to osteopathic physicians.

*The New Jersey Association of Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons cannot provide credits to any other healthcare professionals other than DOs.

The estimated time to complete this activity: 1.5 hours.

Release date: December 20, 2010. Expiration date: December 20, 2012.

Faculty

Bruce Mintz, DO (Moderator)
Clinical Associate Professor, Internal Medicine
Director, Vascular Technology Training Program
University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, New Jersey
Attending, Cardiovascular Medicine
Gagnon Heart Hospital
Morristown Memorial Hospital
Morristown, New Jersey

Mark W. Moritz, MD, FACS
Clinical Professor of Vascular Surgery
University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey
Past President of the American College of Surgeons, New Jersey
Past President of the Vascular Society of New Jersey
Vein Institute of New Jersey
Morristown, New Jersey

ACTIVITY

Instructions

Please complete the pre-test, listen to the following presentations, and complete the post-test and evaluation to receive CME credit for this activity.

Supported by an educational grant from Sanofi-Aventis.

Submit a case to review at meeting:


procced to pretest


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